A hundred thanks to you

In 2016, the National Park Service (NPS) celebrates its 100th birthday. The Parks Conservancy—one of America’s leading nonprofit partners to the NPS—is honored to support your national parklands, and the rangers who have protected our heritage for over a century.

Below, we look back on some of our more recent accomplishments at Golden Gate, achieved through partnership with the NPS; Presidio Trust; Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District; and the agencies of the Tamalpais Lands Collaborative.

Through your generosity and vision, we will ensure the vitality of these parks, through the next Centennial and beyond.

Give Back &

Keep the Parks Glowing

Your thoughtful gift today supports the Golden Gate National Parks. It protects wildlife and ecosystems. It preserves recreational amenities and opportunities. And it provides park access and delight for thousands and thousands of young people every year. Your thoughtful gift today creates a far brighter future tomorrow.

Donate Now

Parks: Of and For the People

Caring for over 30 national park sites—scattered across 80,000 acres that cradle the Golden Gate—is a big job. Fortunately, the Conservancy employs hundreds of hard-working people who make the parks their singular purpose. Hear from our amazing colleagues in this new video. Get to know what we do. Learn why we do it. And see how we derive inspiration from these spectacular places—and passionate supporters like you.

2015 By the Numbers

Crissy Field Center
Totals
Nursery
Visitor Centers
Interns
Volunteers

Financial Statements

Statement of Financial Position as of September 30, 2015 (with Comparative Totals for 2014)

  • Pie Chart

    Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy Fiscal Year 2015 Aid to the Parks

    • Park Interpretation and Visitor Services
      $20,527,359 (49%)
    • Park Enhancements, Restoration, and Stewardship
      $16,353,215 (39%)
    • Youth, Volunteer, and Community Programs
      $5,086,940 (12%)
  • Financial statements of the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy are audited on an annual basis.

    Copies of the complete audited financial statements are available upon request by calling the Parks Conservancy’s Executive Vice President/Chief Operating Officer at (415) 561-3000.

    *Aid to the park includes all program service expenses, excluding cost of goods sold and donated services.

Your Parks

The Golden Gate National Parks

  • Golden Gate National Recreation Area + Muir Woods National
    Monument + Fort Point National Historic Site
  • Nearly 18 million visitors in 2015—more than the visitation to Yosemite, Yellowstone, Grand Canyon, and Zion National Parks combined
  • Over 80,000 acres across 3 counties
  • More than 30 unique park sites
  • Hover or touch the icons to find your favorite!
Alcatraz
Alcatraz

The Rock, famous for its federal prison, is also known for its nesting seabird colonies, restored gardens, military heritage, and history as a site of American Indian protest.

Cliff House
Cliff House

Overlooking the Pacific Ocean, the third incarnation of this legendary San Francisco landmark features a world-class restaurant with breathtaking vistas.

Crissy Field
Crissy Field

A signature restoration project of the Conservancy, Crissy Field is home to an environmental education center, a spectacular promenade, and a marsh teeming with bird life.

Fort Baker
Fort Baker

Elegant Colonial Revival buildings of this former Army post have taken on new life as a LEED-certified national park lodge and the offices of the Institute at the Golden Gate.

Fort Funston
Fort Funston

At the southern edge of the San Francisco coastline, visitors enjoy beach walks and the spectacle of hang gliders taking to the sky over wind-sculpted dunes.

Fort Point
Fort Point

Tucked under the Golden Gate Bridge, this Civil War-era fortress is admired for its magnificent masonry—best appreciated on a candlelight tour.

Kirby Cove
Kirby Cove

Known for its astounding campsites, this hidden cove tucked into the folds of the Marin Headlands offers a one-of-a-kind perspective of the Golden Gate Bridge.

Lands End
Lands End

Revitalized with enhanced trails, gorgeous overlooks, abundant native plants, and a new Lands End Lookout visitor center, this park is a gem on San Francisco’s coast.

Marin Headlands
Marin Headlands

These majestic hills are dotted with historic batteries, former military installations, astonishing trails, and lofty perches from which to spy migrating raptors.

Mount Tamalpais
Mount Tamalpais

The watersheds, wildlife habitats, and opportunities for recreation, education, and stewardship across this iconic Marin peak are the focus of the One Tam campaign.

Muir Woods
Muir Woods

Saved by congressman and philanthropist William Kent and named for John Muir, this beloved grove is known for its towering coast redwoods and serene Redwood Creek.

Olema Valley
Olema Valley

Adjacent to Point Reyes National Seashore, this valley features idyllic trails and picturesque Victorian farmhouses harkening back to the area’s dairy production heyday.

Point Bonita
Point Bonita

Accessed by a heart-pounding trail above the surf, the Point Bonita Lighthouse—moved to its current spot in 1877—stands sentinel at the edge of the continent.

Presidio
Presidio

Overlooking the Pacific Ocean, the third incarnation of this legendary San Francisco landmark features a world-class restaurant with breathtaking vistas.

Stinson Beach
Stinson Beach

One of our most popular beaches, this vast stretch of white sand at the terminus of the Dipsea Trail is a delight for swimmers, surfers, and picnickers.

Sutro Heights
Sutro Heights

The former estate of San Francisco mayor Adolph Sutro showcases a lovely garden and the nearby ruins of his massive Sutro Baths—once the world’s largest natatorium.

Sweeney Ridge
Sweeney Ridge

Just as Spanish explorer Gaspar de Portolà did in 1769, visitors today can take in 360-degree panoramas of San Francisco Bay from this dazzling spot near Milagra Ridge.

Tennessee Valley
Tennessee Valley

A meandering trail winds through a pastoral landscape of rolling hills to a pocket beach and a cove named for the shipwreck of the SS Tennessee.